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Australians are dying in line but there’s a cure…

Somehow over the past hundred years or so, the words ‘doctor’ and ‘wait’ have become synonymous.

No other business makes its customers wait quite like the medical industry does. It’s common to wait more than three months for an initial specialist appointment, and then upon arrival you’re directed into a waiting room (an entire room dedicated to waiting!).

Phoebe Brown – Research and Publishing

 

 

As if since the dawn of time, Australians have been waiting for healthcare.

Waiting lists are no new thing, but with an overburdened health system and a rapidly ageing population, the figures are worsening.

A 2015 report released by the Victorian State Government revealed that some Australians are waiting more than four-and-a-half years to see a specialist doctor in a public hospital before they are considered for further treatment, including surgery. Delays of this length mean that cancers are being found too late, patients are suffering from additional complications and Australians are getting sicker before they are able to get better.

Lack of access to care represents a significant problem. In 2009 the ABS reported that more than 937,000 people aged 15 years and over had been unable to access health services over the past year. 82% of those had not been able to visit a GP, while 9.5% had been unable to see a medical specialist. The main reasons? Almost half of those who went without medical care did so because waiting times were too long or an appointment was not available. Many others (34%) went without treatment because they were unable to get an appointment with a medical specialist close enough to home.

 

Rural and regional Australians face even greater challenges.

Almost a quarter (23%) of people living in regional and remote Australia wait extended periods just to see a GP. Compared with city-dwellers, rural Australians are four and a half times more likely to spend more than an hour travelling to see their GP. Specialists are often located many hours away, posing a cruel predicament for the chronically ill.

So what are we doing about it? With a rapidly ageing ageing over-65’s population (which is set to double over the next 20 years), Australians now face a very real dilemma in healthcare.

We cannot afford to keep doing things the way we are now. We need to make healthcare accessible for all Australians and lessen the pressure on our nation’s already overburdened hospital system.


The good news is, it’s possible—and it’s already happening.

Docto, Australia’s first and only online hospital, is providing Australians with instant online access to Australia’s best medical specialists—at any time, from any location.

A leading telehealth service run by doctors, for patients, Docto is changing the way Australians approach healthcare, by bringing the specialist to the patient, rather than the other way around.

Dr Jon Field – Director and Co-founder

 

Docto is putting an end to specialist waiting lists. The online doctor is providing rural and regional Australians with access to some of the country’s leading medical minds, eliminating the need for patients to drive or fly thousands of kilometres to their nearest city.

Docto is delivering fast, affordable and accessible care: The average time a patient waits to see a Docto specialist is five days.

The Docto difference? Rather than being an online GP, Docto is a comprehensive medical specialist team with expertise for every, any and every case.

Docto provides general medical advice as well as expert medical opinions from hand-picked, highly trained medical specialists. Whether you are looking to see a dermatologist, gynecologist, obstetrician or cardiologist, a neurosurgeon, oncologist, gastroenterologist or radiologist—you can now do so quickly and easily from the comfort of your own home with this online doctor.

24 hours, 7 days a week, Docto is providing Australians with healthcare the way it should be. No more waiting.

 

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